Save to shopping list
Create a new shopping list

Sets of Chasuble with Cope

( number of products: 7 )

Priests, bishops, and clergymen are beacons within their parishes and should always ensure to be dressed in the correct clothing. On many occasions clergymen will have to wear several vestments in the same week or month of the liturgical calendar, including sets of chasubles with copes, and should ensure they have plenty of both to hand. Both the chasuble and the cope are steeped in historical significance and liturgical symbolism. You can find sets of chasubles with cope at vestment.co.uk.

The Cope

Hailing from its humble beginnings as an eighth century raincoat, copes are a type of grand liturgical vestment, similar in shape to large shrouds or mantles. They are draped over the shoulders and feature a long cloak, most notably with a missing hood - the hood is replaced with a panel of decorated embroidered fabric on the back or around the shoulders. A cope is open at the front and sits over the shoulders, where it is held together across the chest by a clasp. 

There are many different types of copes, from the Roman copes which are magnificent pieces, constructed from fine silk or other luxe materials, brightly coloured and covered in intricate and beautiful patterns of embroidery and symbols, to the gothic copes. Setting aside flamboyance for functionality the gothic cope is usually simpler, a finer material allowing ease of movement that is less elaborate than its roman cousins. The gothic cope however, whilst simpler is not simple. The cope itself has a more processional function, and is used at blessings, burials, and consecrations among others, so while the gothic cope is simpler than its Roman counterpart, they are often embroidered with beautiful designs and make for fine garments.

The Chasuble

The chasuble is more than likely one of the most used and most seen vestments that are worn by members of the clergy, and over time they have evolved from the protective poncho worn by ancient Roman farmers to protect themselves from the weather. The chasubles today however are unlike the ponchos of old, similar only in shape. A chasuble is the long and billowy garment that clergymen wear over their other clothes to say Mass and for other services, poncho-like garments that extend down to the thighs or ankles and open at the arms.  They can sometimes be colourful and are often adorned with ecclesiastical symbols.

Similar to copes, there are differing types of chasubles. Roman chasubles tend to be more rounded and shorter, whilst a gothic chasuble is longer and tapers in at the ends. The Roman chasuble is commonly more decorated and grander, featuring beautiful and bright golden embroidery or patterns, and intricate designs from Christian faith. The gothic chasuble is simpler, again favouring functionality, but whilst simpler than the Roman style, they are by no means simple and often stand out from the catalog of vestments as uniquely grand and beautiful.

In Conclusion

Usually the cope is reserved for functions where the chasuble is not used, so while they rarely see each other, sets of chasubles with copes are incredibly important for any member of the clergy, as they will often be seen at the altar or other liturgical ceremonies. From the farmers’ poncho and the choir-men’s’ raincoat to international recognition and being revered worldwide - the development of these vestments is similar to the humble beginnings of Jesus Christ himself, sacred and symbolic and seen by millions, sets of chasubles and copes are important pieces within Christianity, and indeed go hand in hand with services of worship and the church itself.

We care about your privacy

This page uses cookie files to provide its services in accordance to Cookies Usage Policy. You can determine conditions of storing or access to cookie files in your web browser.

Close
pixel