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Zucchetto

( number of products: 4 )

With a small stem of twisted cords on top, it's in the Roman Catholic style. It represents the zucchetto bishop's responsibility to keep monitoring throughout his entire flock, nourishing the feeble and questioning, strengthening the faith, and bringing those who have strayed back into the fold. The pope, cardinals, bishops, abbots, and priests all wear the zucchetto as part of their liturgical and choral attire.

The zucchetto is related to the beret, which was once a big zucchetto, and was derived from the Greek pileus. It was used to keep priests' heads warm in the Early Middle Ages or earlier. It gets its name from its appearance as a half-pumpkin. The resemblance to the Jewish kippah or yarmulke is frequently thought to have been intentional as a reminder of Jesus' and Christianity's Jewish beginnings, though the spiritual importance is essentially completely different.

The modern zucchetto is most typically made of silk or polyester cloth in Catholicism. Eight gores, or triangular panels, are linked at the tips to form a hemispherical skullcap in this style. Stripes, constructed of twisted loops of silk rope, protrude from the centre at the top. It has a simple natural cotton lining.

The zucchetto's colour denotes the wearer's rank:

The zucchetto is worn by all ordained members of the Roman Catholic Church. Priests generally wear the black zucchetto, bishops wear the church-purple zucchetto, and cardinals wear the red zucchetto. Vestment affords zucchetto at valuable prices. A pope is associated with the colour white. The employment of the black zucchetto by priests and deacons is unusual and frequently seen as an oddity. To match their brown habit, some friar-preachers have taken to wearing a brown zucchetto Bianco. The pope usually matches his white cassock with a white zucchetto.

Anglican bishops wear a version of the zucchetto that is similar to that worn by Catholic bishops. The other exception is that Anglican churches frequently choose purple instead of the Catholic "church violet" for zucchetto bishops. It was first used to keep the clergy's tonsured heads warm in cold, damp churches, and it has since become a customary article of clothing. The zucchetto is worn by all ordained members of the church.

The most frequent Anglican design is based on the Catholic zucchetto or, more commonly, the Jewish yarmulke. Anglican bishops wear a version of the zucchetto that is similar to that worn by Catholic bishops. The Anglican "skullcap" called zucchetto Bianco differs from the zucchetto in that it has six panels, a button in the centre of the crown, and is slightly bigger than the zucchetto. The other exception is that Anglican churches frequently choose purple instead of the Catholic "church violet" for bishops. Nearly all priests in the Syriac Orthodox church wear a phiro, a seven-panel zucchetto bishop. It's always black, with black Orthodox crosses embroidered on it.

The zucchetto Bianco is worn by all clergy who have the episcopal character, that is, dioceses, whether the Pope, cardinals, honorary bishops or metropolitan bishops, for the majority of the Eucharist, abandoning it at the start of the Ritual and reinstalling it at the end of Reconciliation. At Mass, no one else is allowed to adorn the zucchetto.

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